Britain’s Future in Europe

The Programme for the upcoming German British Forum Conference “Britain’s Future in Europe: Anglo-German Perspectives” is now available.

With confirmed speakers including The Right Hon. Lord David Owen,The Right Hon. Lord Peter Mandelson, and the German Federal Minister of Finance Dr Wolfgang Schäuble, it promises to be a stimulating and significant event.

Advertisements

 

Click to download the details.

German British Forum Conference 2016
Click to view or download the programme

Why Brexit is So Likely

As a German I would definitely like Britain to remain in the EU – with my English hat on it is, however a bit less clear cut.

This is based on the transcript for a speech given at the Kapitalmarkt Forum of Commerzbank AG in Hamburg, October 2015. Lesen Sie diese auf Deutsch

There are a number of reasons why the British people may prefer an exit in the forthcoming in/out referendum. These are quite apart from any economic arguments that have been put forward and which may point to staying in.

Firstly this island paradise is already overpopulated and has too much foreign influence – in most British eyes. Immigration from Commonwealth countries in Asia, Africa and the Caribbean started decades ago, is still strong and the integration process in many peoples’ eyes has not gone well.

The new immigrants from Europe were welcomed to start with – Polish plumbers were much in demand during the big housing boom prior to the recession. Instead of using the permissible EU quota system, Labour decided to let all in who wanted to come. During the recession when unemployment was high and afterwards, when wages remained depressed, politicians like Farage and others took advantage to blame Britain’s membership in the EU. The fact that Europe went through a terrible time made their argument even stronger. The Merkel invitation to all refugees from Muslim populated countries into Europe is possibly the final straw in the debate about immigration.

Whilst Germany may be able to cope and eventually integrate these people and bolster its workforce, the rest of Europe is struggling with it. And so is Britain. One big reason is that Britain has never had and probably will never have an infrastructure to cope with large scale immigration. No identity cards, no border controls on exit are just two examples. Students come on a six months visa and stay for twenty years; nobody knows how many are living in Britain. This is one of the main reasons why Britain has become the preferred immigration country – apart from the fact that the whole world speaks some broken English and that seemingly unlimited numbers of unskilled jobs are available in the service sector.

Secondly, structures and regulations are quite alien to the British and they do not care for them.

It’s a cultural thing; it starts with the language: a grammar with more exceptions to rules than rules themselves. Easy to learn, but very difficult to perfect. One also prefers to express oneself vaguely rather than clearly, as the anthropologist Kate Fox describes beautifully in her book Watching the English.

Very interesting” usually means “boring” or “rubbish“. “You must come for dinner” means you never hear again. Speaking your mind is – particularly if it comes from a German – called blunt, or in your face, or worse. Proper English is not only a living and constantly evolving language, it is also an important domain for the true Brits.

My friend Prof Thomas Kielinger, correspondent for Die Welt, has showcased this splendidly in his book “Crossroads and Roundabouts” – everything is constantly in flux.  The Germans like regulation; they stand patiently at a road crossing and wait for green to cross the street – whether there are cars coming or not. But in the UK, self-reliance and self-regulation is more important than rule by the authorities.

Labour flexibility is the name of the game in the world of business in Britain, and employment laws don’t fit easily into an adversarial culture. For Germans with their more consensual model they are the norm.

Another huge difference – Britain sports “case law” whilst the Continent has written law – another non-fit and quite alien.

So it’s not surprising that that there is so much opposition to the huge amount of regulation coming out of Brussels, lots of it of course unnecessary.

Thirdly, the press in the UK is mostly Eurosceptic, and their owners are probably frightened of all the possible rules and regulations that might come their way one day. For them the debate has started in earnest and their influence on the referendum should not be underestimated.

And finally, the Exit Supporters have simpler messages:

  • We want our country back from those unelected and overpaid bureaucrats in Brussels
  • Being outside the Eurozone, Britain will have little influence and will be a second grade player forever
  • In language, history and politics, the UK is closer to the USA than to Europe – and when it matters, has to follow America.
  • The Europeans sell more to us than we to them – it’s all to their advantage
  • You can’t trust the Europeans – least of all the French and the Germans, who are suspect, as they want to rule Europe again
  • The City contributes more to GDP than manufacturing and Brussels wants to break or undermine its supremacy in Europe.

As a German I would definitely like Britain to remain in the EU – with my English hat on it is, however a bit less clear cut.

The more EU or German politicians try to help the UK to remain in the EU, the more it appears to the Eurosceptics that the Europeans are doing it for their own advantage. A real conundrum. It will require very finely tuned political handling to find the right tone here. Sentimentality is neither suitable nor wanted. The Anglos always were from Mars and the Europeans more often from Venus (even the Germans nowadays – to everyone’s confusion).

Will Britain exit? The Scots were very close to leaving and to creating a social democratic country. They have promised that if the UK overall votes “out” and the Scots vote “in” then there will be another referendum in Scotland, and the Scots may well leave the UK. There could be some tactical voting here!

Much depends on how Europe portrays itself until voting day. If the Eurozone develops on a positive trend economically, as it appears to be doing at the moment, that will take some of the wind out of the sails of the no campaigners; if not – and if the immigration problem gets worse, which is more likely, then I feel that many Brits will want to shut off the tunnel for good.

BB/January 2016

Why Brexit is So Likely (auf Deutsch)

Bob Bischof speaks about the inevitability of the ‘Brexit’ with his German-British perspective. Read the transcript here.

This is the transcript for a speech given at the prestigious Kapitalmarkt Forum of Commerzbank AG in Hamburg, October 2015. Read the English version here.

Ladies and Gentlemen, meine Damen und Herren

Es gibt eine Reihe von Gruenden dafuer, dass die Briten den Exit vorziehen koennten bzw ich moechte darstellen, wie hoch der Berg ist, den die Briten ueberwinden muesssen, um sich fuer Europa zu entscheiden oder gar zu begeistern – dann koennen Sie selbst entscheiden, wie hoch die Wahrscheinlichkeit ist.

Dazu muss man die folgenden Scenarien verstehen

  1. Das Inselparadies ist bereits uebervoelkert und ueberfremdet in vieler Briten Augen. Die Einwanderung aus den ehemaligen Kolonien wie Indien, Pakistan, Afrika und dem Karibik Raum begann schon vor Jahrzehnten und viele der Immigranten sind wenig integriert und leben in bestimmten Ballungsrauemen. Die neue Immigration aus Europa wurde zunaechst begruesst – polnische Klempner waren begehrte Fachkraefte waerend des grossen Haeuserbooms in der Vor-Rezessionszeit. Als danach die Arbeitsosigkeit und ebenfalls die Europafeindlichkeit stieg begannen Politiker wie Adolf Farage sorry der heisst Nigel mit Vornamen mit simplen Parolen wie „die nehmen uns die Arbeit weg und sind fuer die hohen Hauspreise verantwortlich“ Schlagzeilen zu machen und die Regierung unter Druck zu setzen. Seine UK Indepence Party (UKIP) gewann die Europa Wahl und Prime Minister Cameron musste sich unter Druck seines rechten, ausserordentlich euroskeptischen Fluegels auf das Referendum einlassen.

Die Immigration ist tatsaechlich ein heisses Thema besonders weil UK

– wie ich im naechsten Teil darstellen werde, ein Land ist, dass total unterstrukturiert ist – wie Deutschland vielleicht ueberstruckturiert ist. Da es keine Personalausweise –identity cards – gibt und niemand weder Fahrzeugpapiere noch einen Fuehrerschein bei sich haben muss, weiss man nicht wie viele ueberhaupt im Lande sind. Hinzu kommt, dass es nur Grenzkontrollen bei der Einreise, aber nicht bei der Ausreise gibt. Studenten kommen mit Visa nach GB und keiner kontrolliert, wann sie wieder abreisen. Great Britain ist deswegen ein bevorzugtes Einwanderland und auch weil die ganze Welt zumindest gebrochenes Englisch spricht und wie spaeter erklaert, es unskilled (ungelernte) Jobs in Huelle und Fuelle gibt.

  1. Regeln, Strukturen und Vorschriften liegen den Englaendern nicht

a. Es geht mit der Sprache los. Die Sprache hat kaum Regeln und die Grammatik besteht im wesentlichen aus Ausnahmen. Daher ist sie leicht zu lernen aber unendlich schwer zu perfektionieren. Man drueckt sich auch ungern klar aus, wie Anthropologin Kate Fox in ihrem Buch „Watching the English“ so gut beschreibt. Very interesting heisst total rubbish etc Henning Wehn, der deutsche Komiker, der in England Furore macht, beshreibt das herrlich

b. Es gibt weder eine geschriebene Konsitution noch ein BGB oder HGB – alles ist auf case law aufgebaut und damit interpretierbar – Beispiel die sogenannten „Pay Day Loans“ mit 4stelligen Zinssaetzen waeren auf dem Kontinent unmoeglich, da es Wuchergesaetze oder aehnliches gibt

c. Main Freund Prof Thomas Killinger, Korrespondent der Welt in UK hat das vortrefflich in seinem Buch „Crossroads and Roundabouts“ beschrieben – alles ist staendig im Fluss

Meine Damen und Herren – stellen Sie sich vor, was sich da abspielt, wenn so eine Gesellschaft von unseren EU Freunden in Bruessel mit Regelungen und Vorschriften ueber alles und jedes beglueckt wird…..Das passt wie die Faust aufs Auge.

  1. In der Wirtschaft steht die Flexibility im Vordergrund und Arbeiter-und Angestellten Schutzgesetze (Employment Law) passen da ueberhaupt nicht hin. Wir in Europa sind an diese Dinge wie Mitbestimmung gewoehnt, fuer die englische Wirtschaft ist das alles ein rotes Tuch. Es gibt in UK etwa 2 millionen Zero-hour contracts, bei McDonald allein etwa 100.000, d.h. man wird nur bezahlt, wenn Arbeit da ist.

Als Ausbildung wird in der Regel das „on-the-job“ training als ausreichend angesehen. Im Service Sektor ist das auch oft ausreichend im Herstellbereich nicht – aber der schrunft sich schon seit Jahren gesund und liegt inzwischen bei knapp 10% vom GDP

  1. Die Presse ist ueberwaeltigend rechts, zum Teil rechts von Tchingis Khan

a. Allen voran die Murdoch Presse mit eienm Zeitungs- und TV Empire, dass euroskeptisch ist und mit grossem Misstrauen den Kontinent betrachtet. Murdoch’s Einfluss ist so gross, das Blair und Brown jede Idee von einem Stakeholder Model a la Soziale Marktwirschaft aufgeben mussten. Am 8.1.1996 hielt Blair eine Rede in Singapore ueber die Vorteile des Stakeholder Models. Drei Wochen spaeter mussten Blair und Brown bei Murdoch antreten – das Wort stakeholder wurde danach aus jedem Labour Program gestrichen. Fast wie zu Stalin’s Zeiten, wenn ein General oder Politiker ausradiert wurde.

b. Die Daily Mail, Daily Express und Daily Telegraph sowie und ihre lokalen Ableger sind noch extremer eurofeindlich mit fast taeglichen Attacken auf Bruessel oder auch Deutschland und Frankreich

c. Man darf nicht uebersehen, wie hoch die Auflagen der Zeitungen in UK sind – etwa das zehnfache der deutschen… Die Leser werden in allen Zeitungen mit 20-40 Seiten Sportberichten gefuettert. Wie im alten Rom – Brot (minimum wage) und Spiele. Vorne eine paar Schlagzeilen, harte Kommentare wobei Information oft hinter Meinungsmache zurueckbleibt

d. Guardian und Mirror auf der linken Seite haben wenig Chancen sind aber auch klar tendenzioes ausgereichtet – nur nach links.

  1. Die Exit Befuerworter haben die simpleren Messages a. Ohne Mitglied des Euro Clubs zu sein, ist UK ohne wirkliches Mitspracherecht im Kreis der Grossen und braucht eine Sonderstellung bzw ist besser gleich draussen b. Sprachlich, politisch und kulturell ist UK naeher an USA als an Europa und muss im Zweiferlsfalle immer Amerika folgenc. Den Europaern allen voran den Franzosen kann man nicht trauend. Europa ohne Grenzen ueberschwemmt das Land mit Fremden
  1. Die City hat einen ebenso grossen Anteil am GDP wie der Manufacturing Sektor; die einen brauchen Volatility die anderen Stabilitaet. Vorschriften aus Bruessel werden oft als Unterwanderungsabsicht der Kontinentaleuropaer gegen die Vormachtstellung der City in allen Finanzangelegenheiten dargestellt. Freiwillige Ueberwachung hat zwar in der Vergangenheit nicht funktioniert aber wir nach wie vor bevorzugt. Die Meinung in der City ist jedoch sehr geteilt was das Referendum angeht, aber ueberwiegend pro EU Verbeib – allerdings sie war immer anti Euro, da der Euro bedeutet, dass man nicht mehr mit Waehrungen von 19 Laendern spielen kann, sondern nur noch mit dem Euro.
  1. Was sagt die verarbeitende Wirtschaft dazu?

Ueberwaeltigend dafuer in der EU zu bleiben, aber moeglichst mit einer „reformierten EU“ – weniger Regeln, mehr Subsidiarity, Einspruchsrecht (Veto) im Arbeitsrecht und Finanz- und Steuerangelegenheiten etc

Als Deutscher moechte ich die Briten klar in der EU behalten – mit meinem englischen Hut auf, sehe ich das allerdings nicht unbedingt so eindeutig.

Nebenbei, je mehr sich die deutschen Politiker um UK bemuehen, um sie in der EU zu halten, desto mehr erscheint es den Insulanern, dass die Europaer das nur aus Eigennutz befuerworten zum Nachteil der Englaender. Es bedarf also grosses politisches Fingerspitzengefuehl, hier den rechten Ton zu finden. Sentimentalitaet ist wenig angebracht oder gefragt. Die Anglos waren schon immer von Mars und die Europaer eher von Venus (selbst die Deutschen zur allgemeinen Verwirrung neuerdings).

Mae West Zitat – “When she was good, she was very very good, but when she was bad, she was …. magnificent”. Leicht abgewandelt auf Deutschland bezogen wuerde das heissen

When the Germans are bad, they are awful, but when they are good …. they are even more annoying.

Ce la vie!

Werden die Briten austreten? Die Schotten waren nahe daran, die UK zu verlassen und ein sozial-demokatisches Land zu bilden und haben geschworen, dass wenn Grossbritannien insgesamt mit „out“ waehlt und die Schotten mit „in“, dann wird es ein neues Referendum in Schottland geben und die Schotten wuerden die UK eventuell dann verlassen. Die Scottish National Party, die eine grosse Mehrheit hat, ist nebenbei am weitesten links (im englischen Sinne) – sie nennt sich „progressiv“ und befuerwortet das Model der sozialen Marktwirtschaft a la Germany.

Die neue Labour Opposition unter Jeremy Corbyn ist ein natuerlicher Verbuendeter der SNP, steht allerdings auf sehr fragwuerdigen politischen Positionen wie Verstaatlichung der Bahn und Energiewirtschaft, ist allerdings pro-Europa.

Vieles haengt natuerlich davon ab, wie Europa sich bis zum Wahltag darstellt. Falls die Eurozone sich positiv entwickelt, ist den Austretern schon ein wenig Wind aus den Segeln genommen. Falls nicht und falls sich das Immigrationsthema noch schlimmer entwickelt, wollen viele Englaender den Tunnel wieder zuschuetten …

Bob Bischof – September 2015

R3 Business Recovery Conference 2015

R3 Conference 2015 - The Winds of Change
Click to see the conference introduction

Bob Bischof was a speaker at the R3 conference 2015.

Here is an extract from the programme:

The insolvency and restructuring profession must overcome significant challenges as we face up to the threat of unprecedented change.
new legislation in the UK, the drive for ‘harmonisation’ in Europe, the perceived attraction of US style Chapter 11 concepts, and much decreased levels of formal insolvency present the profession with real and present challenges. The nature of insolvency inherently dictates that the insolvency profession is frequently ‘under the spotlight’.

Although our profession is highly regulated, and the UK’s regime is one of the best in the world, we need always to bear in mind that we are under constant scrutiny from politicians, press and the public. The UK insolvency profession does an excellent job in delivering the best results for creditors and debtors, and we have got much better at communicating our value to those all-important stakeholders.

But there is more we can do. To achieve the status of a trusted profession we must demonstrate integrity in all we do. Adherence to the principles behind the rules is as important as adhering to the rules themselves. In the same way that company directors’ responsibilities have widened, insolvency practitioners should always remember that trust and confidence in the insolvency profession depends on their actions and behaviour, passing continually higher tests of performance.

All of these issues and much more will be discussed at the r3 annual conference
Phillip Sykes, Baker Tilly
r3 President (April 2015)

Foreign Takeovers and Nationalism – BBC World Service

With takeovers like the AstraZeneca – Pfizer bid much in the news, Bob Bischof joins a panel of industry experts for the BBC World Service programme ‘In the Balance’ to discuss foreign takeovers and the national interest.

Bob Bischof on 'In the Balance'With takeovers like the AstraZeneca – Pfizer bid much in the news, Bob Bischof joins a panel of other business experts for the BBC World Service programme  ‘In the Balance‘ to discuss foreign takeovers and the national interest.

You can listen to the half-hour programme here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01y0sb9

 

Interview: European Trade Protectionism

Bob Bischof, vice president of the German British Chamber of Industry & Commerce, talks with Charles Powell, member of the U.K. House of Lords, about European trade protectionism, U.K. inward investment and growth, in an interview with Francine Lacqua and Guy Johnson on Bloomberg Television’s “The Pulse.” (Source: Bloomberg)

Watch the interview here

Bob Bischof discusses European protectionism on Bloomberg TV
Bob Bischof discusses European protectionism on Bloomberg TV

Neue Labour: Can German Business Ideas Revive the UK Economy?

Sunday 11 March 2012 – Bob Bischof appeared on BBC Radio 4’s ‘Analysis’ to share the ideas from Germany that could help improve the UK’s fortunes.

Presenter Matthew Taylor travels to Bob’s birthplace, Hamburg, to discover how apprenticeships are set up to buffer businesses and workers against hard times.

You can listen to the programme in full here: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b01cvkg6

The BBC article by Matthew Taylor is at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-17213556

Investment in Skills & Productivity: German-British Forum Conference

Better training as the key to economic dynamism

Bob Bischof will be co-chairing the upcoming German-British Forum Conference on Monday 22 and Tuesday 23rd November this year.

Entitled Investment in Skills & Productivity: Better training as the key to economic dynamism, the conference will address pressing macro- and micro-economic themes around how to ensure young people are being trained in the right ways to address the future needs of modern European economies.

Investment in Skills: the German-British Forum Conference
Download the Conference Programme and Registration Form PDF

Europe as a whole recognises that a high-skill, high-productivity economy provides the most effective platform to boost competitiveness and enhance well-being.

As Peter Loescher, Chief Executive of Siemens AG, put it at the Annual Dinner of the German-British Chamber of Industry and Commerce on 9 June 2010 in London;

“We have to get the message across to our youngsters in schools and universities that we need to out-innovate the innovators all over the world.”

German Industry UK (GIUK) has been at the forefront of efforts by German businesses in the UK to attempt to provide in Britain a framework similar to the German Dual Training System.

GIUK has held constructive meetings with Ministers from both the Labour government and the new Conservative-Liberal coalition administration and has now set up a working group within the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills to determine how this can be done for England.

The new UK government has made tackling the skills gap a significant priority in its efforts to spur economic renewal. There is considerable interest in learning lessons from Germany, where equipping the workforce with competitive skills through the vaunted apprenticeship and vocational training system, in partnership with industry, has long been a centre-piece of economic policy.

The presence of a large number of German companies in the UK has added impetus. Underlining this point, Robert Bosch, BMW, EON and Siemens are all giving support to the conference.

The gathering will highlight the role of the Technician Council, a new body set up in the UK to promote a new non-academic route to technical excellence for employees in many different fields.